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Re: inventing

Postby Patent_Attorney » Wed Oct 15, 2008 7:53 am

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Roger Brown wrote:
The patent office has stated that only 3% of patented items make it to market. I would contribute that to the fact that a large portion of those items patented are not items that the general consumer would purchase even if the inventor had the money to produce the product.


I highly disagree with that statement from the USPTO. I am a patent attorney and 80% of applications in the system corresponds to current products being sold. Only about 20% of corporate R&D was directed toward things not currently produced and dumped after it could not be incorporated into an item even if a patent issues.

A better indicator if it went to market is whether the patent is assigned to a corporation.

Understanding what you are reading

Postby Mr Invention » Wed Oct 15, 2008 8:19 am

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The key word in my above statement is 99.97% of ALL ideas never get to market of which most were never to get beyond a stage of thought much less acted upon. How many people do you think have ideas every day but don't put forth any effort to get them to market other than dissucssing it with their best friend even if they do that. As for the 3% figure that the PTO came up with as for ideas that might get to market (How do they know?), that was only provided because of the American Inventors Protection Act of 1999. One must also remember that just because a product gets to market, that does not insure success and once again what is considered success (Ambiguities, Ambiguities, Ambiguities, Generalities, Generalities, Generalities)? I have had some products in the market palce for over 30 years and I have had products that were not successful. I have had less successful products in the market place than unsuccessful products. All of the thousands of people that I have communicated with over the years would like to have instant success with very little or no investment in their ideas. I have seen the wreckage in the idea business both from my own personal involvement and people that have come to me after they lost substantial monies through invention promotion companies. Unfortuantely in the real world (Where I spend most of my time and money) any business venture is inherently risky and if you can't stand the heat get out of the venture. I have also seen a pattern form over my keeping records for the past 40 years that indicates most of the people with ideas are very young (Under the age of 40) and have unrealistic expectations. My clients average age is 58 years old. By that age you may have some gambling money and have been beat up by the realities of life thus have realistic expectations involving any business venture.

Postby Patent_Attorney » Wed Oct 15, 2008 8:45 am

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What is your point. An idea is just an idea and not an invention. Of course most ideas are bad.

I disagree about age. The point that you are making is that there is age discrimination against the younger inventor. However, the two inventors that I know that have made the most money were 25-30 when they applied for their cash cow patent and made more in one year than my 8 as a patent attorney.

Postby taniaj » Wed Oct 15, 2008 2:43 pm

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I was told that an idea can be great and still not make it if it costs too much to make, the manufacturer doesn't see a long term ( more than 5 years) profit.
There could be too many of the same sort of thing already out there. Too many inventions are merely improvements of products out there that already don't make enough profit.

patent

Postby Roger Brown » Thu Oct 30, 2008 8:04 pm

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Branding has to be another consideration as to why a product makes it or fails. Look at Fad products. What made them go unnoticed and then suddenly everyone has to have one? Humans will buy things just to fit in with the crowd, seem cool or show their wealth. It isn't always that the product is good just something for them to have.
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Re: Why don't most patented products succeed

Postby ATtheLake » Thu Jan 06, 2011 5:16 pm

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Aren't most patents obtained by major corporations like IBM to protect their own ideas and not neccesarilly to come up with new products

Re: Why don't most patented products succeed

Postby ATtheLake » Mon Apr 04, 2011 1:38 pm

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I haven't been on the forum much since I heard it was shutting down... It still seems to be up and running though, which is great..

I just wanted to add another tid-bit to this after re-reading this post again...

One thing that I have noticed in the last couple months which I have made a habit of.. Often times when I go to say... Wal-Mart, Target, Home Depot, Gander Mountain etc.. big-box stores as they call em... I notice if you see a new product, and read the packaging it seems the overwhelming majority of everyday usage or at least common products often times don't have a patent number on them.. Or they say patent pending..

Like i said much of the stuff on store shelves depending on what types of products, don't even have a patent, which I understand right ?? has to be labeled on the item or packaging if it does...

I makes me realize the power of BRAND.. I am not discounting a patents worth, but say for instance one had a fad product, such as silly bands for a hypothetical example (I don't know if they are patented or not) If a company could be the first to market with it, with the initial brand power or recognition, I think the would stand good chance to dominate in their market for awhile even if competitors arouse

just my humble opinion :lol:

Re: Why don't most patented products succeed

Postby Roger Brown » Tue Apr 19, 2011 11:49 am

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Branding can be more powerful than any patent if it is done right. Look at the major sof drink companies. No patent yet they are worldwide and own the major market share.
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Re: Why don't most patented products succeed

Postby Stuart21 » Sun May 15, 2011 4:33 am

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Roger Brown wrote:
"The patent office has stated that only 3% of patented items make it to market."

Patent Attorney wrote -
"I highly disagree with that statement from the USPTO. I am a patent attorney and 80% of applications in the system corresponds to current products being sold ...."

I highly suspect your statement, Patent Attorney. What percentage of YOUR CLIENTS are nett positive from their inventing?

Re: Why don't most patented products succeed

Postby Roger Brown » Tue May 17, 2011 7:57 am

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Patent Attorney, if 80% of applications in the system corresponds to current products being sold ...."

I have to ask where are they? Look at these stats http://www.uspto.gov/web/offices/ac/ido ... s_stat.htm Just because a patent was issued it does not mean a product on the shelf correspondes to it. Many patents are issued and put in a companies drawer and never see the light of day. Others go to market and sell poorly or not at all and die a quick death, Others have Inventors that try and build a business around it, have never runa business and it fails. Then you have those that get a patent don't know where to go next and spend money with invention submission companies and see little if any succuss. Then you have the others that just wanted to prove to themselves they could get a patent and have no dream of going to market with it.
I have always told Inventors "A patent does not equal marketability" It is just a piece of paper. It does not mean companies will be beating down your door to market your product. It does not guarantee there even is a market for your idea. Another example I use is "edible sneakers" you may be able to get it patented but would anyone really buy it?
I get told by Patent Lawyers and Patent Attorneys all the time that I am cutting into their business by telling Inventors not to get a patent. I have to remind them I am not telling Invnetors NOT to get a patent. I am telling them to make sure they need one before just rushing out and getting one. A patent is like any other tool. You only use it when needed. You don't use a hammer to vacuum a floor and you don't use a vacuum to drive nails into wood.
In some cases a patent is a foolish investment if your product is a fad or small niche product. You would be better served putting your money towards branding. Why pay $15,000 for a patent that wouldn't even issue by the time the product has run its course on the shelf? Inventors need to make informed decisions when it comes to using Invention Submission companies or patent Lawyers.
Come visit my sites at http://www.RogerBrown.net
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I have gotten 9 products licensed spending less than $100 on each, you can too.
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