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Are U.S Manufactures are to Slow?

Postby Derek Pater » Sun Oct 04, 2009 1:45 am

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Are U.S Manufactures are to Slow?

The time it takes for most U.S Manufactures to move on a product, I can already have the tooling built and Patents applied from Asia.
The U.S Manufactures love a new product that they only need to have a supply agreement with an Asian Manufacture because they carry all the costs; it’s a no brainer for the U.S Company provided it fits their market.

The quickest answer I had from an Asian Manufacture for a License Agreement is 1 week

I have a Canadian Client who signed a License agreement with a U.S Manufacture nothing has happened for 18 months, even companies from the U.S Making a decision they must be all asleep at the wheel, looking from my perspective at U.S Companies, I am best to License to a Asian Manufacture, because then I can approach a U.S Company and not get shafted by these U.S Companies, because I have the backing of a Taiwan Manufacture, I will say if you have a brilliant product this will make the U.S Companies very aggressive to do a deal quickly, I know what this is like.

:D :D

Re: Are U.S Manufactures are to Slow?

Postby konabean » Sun Oct 04, 2009 11:32 am

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US Automotive Manufacturers are intentionally slow. They have no NO desire to change the status quo. They make Billions of $$$$ with things as they are. Using gasoline, oil and all the parts that need to be changed each quarter, aka, every three monts. If they switch to Battery power they Loose Billions by NO MORE OIL CHANGES & the Oil filters, spark plugs, etc etc. That is why they killed the electric car and harassed the California Auto regulatory agency with Lawyers costing Millions to stop the manditory Zero Carbon Automobile Mandate !!!!! Its GREED not SPEED they are into!!!!!!! :(

Re: Are U.S Manufactures are to Slow?

Postby Derek Pater » Mon Oct 05, 2009 1:03 am

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Times are a changing, the car Manufactures now have no choice but to go to Hybrids and forward green, otherwise they will go bankrupt and Toyota, Honda and the Teslsra Roadster type companies will get a larger market share.
Now the U.S Government has up to 60% share in Companies like GM, its game over for the old ways

Carbon trading is here to stay and it has just begun, the bigest problem is the power generation it accounts for about half the Carbon pollution problems.
The days of more is better are gone! , you waste it you pay for it quite simple

Are U.S Manufactures are to Slow?

Postby Scrupulous » Mon Oct 05, 2009 10:33 am

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[TOPIC RELOCATED]

Re: Are U.S Manufactures are to Slow?

Postby artbum » Fri Oct 23, 2009 2:50 pm

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then I can approach a U.S Company and not get shafted by these U.S Companies, because I have the backing of a Taiwan Manufacture,


Hmm, so if a Taiwan manufacturer buys your idea and you assign your patent to them, do you then go to the American company and pitch them your product saying that ABC Taiwanese Company already paid for the patent and are working on the manufacturing? So, you would sort-of be doing the selling work for the Taiwanese company, right? (of course, you the inventor also benefits from the royalties) Do you tell the American company to contact the Taiwanese company?

Re: Are U.S Manufactures are to Slow?

Postby Derek Pater » Fri Oct 23, 2009 4:35 pm

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Hmm, so if a Taiwan manufacturer buys your idea and you assign your patent to them, do you then go to the American company and pitch them your product saying that ABC Taiwanese Company already paid for the patent and are working on the manufacturing? So, you would sort-of be doing the selling work for the Taiwanese company, right? (of course, you the inventor also benefits from the royalties) Do you tell the American company to contact the Taiwanese company?


There are a few ways this can work out; yes you can approach a U.S Manufacture with the FOB Pricing Taiwan with your 5-20% royalties hidden in a secrecy agreement within the Licence Agreement. From my experience the U.S Large branded Manufactures require FOB Pricing from the Inventor, better chance of a deal, than trying to Licence the Invention only even with a Patent.
The Taiwan Manufacture will love to OEM to a Large U.S Branded Company.

Or the Taiwan Manufacture will send samples of your new product to all their distributors worldwide and take it the trade shows for orders! To the distributor branding requirements.

Do you tell the American company to contact the Taiwanese company?


The above quote requires the Inventor to be very proactive, there is a LAZY INVENTOR Factor and LAZY LARGE MANUFACTURE Factor that comes into play here.
:D :D

Re: Are U.S Manufactures are to Slow?

Postby Derek Pater » Fri Oct 23, 2009 11:29 pm

Derek Pater
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Location: Melbourne Australia
Hmm, so if a Taiwan manufacturer buys your idea and you assign your patent to them, do you then go to the American company and pitch them your product saying that ABC Taiwanese Company already paid for the patent and are working on the manufacturing? So, you would sort-of be doing the selling work for the Taiwanese company, right? (of course, you the inventor also benefits from the royalties) Do you tell the American company to contact the Taiwanese company?



I get the feeling from your Comments that you as a Inventor have been bullied by a Large U.S Manufacture into a royalty agreement of 2.5% and they are doing you a big favour by taking on your new product and later you realize you have been ripped off, because your royalties are not covering your Patent cost that you pay for? Correct!

Re: Are U.S Manufactures are to Slow?

Postby marchse » Sun Jul 04, 2010 10:37 pm

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If there is a necessity to slow down the process then it is welcomed..

Power Plant Development

Re: Are U.S Manufactures are to Slow?

Postby blowfish » Mon Jul 19, 2010 12:15 am

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I dont get what you are saying?

Is it you sell the full rights to the Asian manufacturer then go to the USA company whatever and say hey theres a great product here sign this agreement ?
But if so how can you hide the fact your takng royalties and how can yo uget those from the Asian manufacturer?


More details need to e posted please

Re: Are U.S Manufactures are to Slow?

Postby angelina » Wed Aug 18, 2010 7:43 pm

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HI,

New orders to U.S. factories rose less than expected in April, with the increase led by a jump in civilian aircraft orders, official data showed on June 3.

Orders for manufactured goods increased 1.2% from March after an upwardly revised 1.7% gain in April, the Commerce Department said.

New orders have increased in 12 of the past 13 months.

Excluding new orders for transportation goods, which can vary widely from month to month, factory orders fell 0.5% after a 3.8% increase in March.

Commercial aircraft orders soared 228.1%.

The Commerce Department also said April orders for durable goods -- big-ticket items expected to last a few years -- were slightly lower than originally estimated, at 2.8% instead of 2.9%.

Overall, orders of manufactured goods have increased 15.6% in the year to date as the manufacturing sector leads the economy out of the worst recession in decades.

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