FAQ  •   Login  •   Register  •   Subscribe 

Welcome to the Forum for InventorSpot.com, the most popular invention related website in the world. Read our welcome message.

Skip to content

Moderators: Michelle, Scrupulous, Roger Brown, citizen


invention

Postby Roger Brown » Sun Sep 30, 2007 8:06 am

User avatar
Roger Brown
Black Belt
 
Posts: 1178
Joined: Mon Oct 30, 2006 2:53 pm
Location: USA
Can you take your idea off your taxes as a contribution? LOL :D
Come visit my sites at http://www.RogerBrown.net
or http://www.looking2license.com
I have gotten 9 products licensed spending less than $100 on each, you can too.

Postby Road Show » Sun Sep 30, 2007 9:13 am

User avatar
Road Show
Brown Belt
 
Posts: 962
Joined: Mon Nov 20, 2006 5:39 pm
Location: SoCal
Fine. Let's join forces, mojo, but we can't discuss here as the rules specify "non-published", original ideas only.

Email me at theroadshowguy@yahoo.com .

Any one else wishing to join the team (limited to six per the rules)? Email me! Are you ok with that, mojo?

RSG

Postby mojo62 » Sun Sep 30, 2007 9:26 am

User avatar
mojo62
Black Belt
 
Posts: 1101
Joined: Tue May 08, 2007 4:54 pm
Location: Texas
Sounds good to me ! I will e-mail you after I have some time to study more on the subject. But yeah, let's give it a shot !!! :)

Postby Work2XL » Sun Sep 30, 2007 5:09 pm

User avatar
Work2XL
Blue Belt
 
Posts: 478
Joined: Tue Apr 24, 2007 7:56 pm
Location: Denver
Good luck guys. Like both you Roger and Road said, I like the cause, I suspect the motivation. I would submit an idea if it was one that I had no intention on pursuing myself in any way.

I did tell my son about it.

Randy

Postby Richard Tate of HopeLab » Mon Oct 01, 2007 7:14 am

Richard Tate of HopeLab
White Belt
 
Posts: 3
Joined: Mon Oct 01, 2007 7:08 am
HopeLab is a non-profit organization committed to developing innovative solutions for young people with chronic illness. Through the Ruckus Nation competition, we are looking for new ideas for products that will increase physical activity among middle-school aged kids to help address the effects of obesity. We will develop and test the best product ideas we receive and--if our research finds that they are effective--will work to distribute them to kids.

As a non-profit, HopeLab will not make profits off of these products.

We believe wholeheartedly that there is plenty of room in this field for great ideas and many approaches to bringing great ideas to market. The idea competition approach that HopeLab has chosen with Ruckus Nation requires that, by submitting an entry, the entrant grants HopeLab an option to acquire a non-exclusive license to any ideas and inventions described in that entry, for which HopeLab will pay $250. This option expires one year from the date on which Ruckus Nation winners are announced.

This means that if you do not win in your Competition Category (category winners receive $25,000), you/your team would still own the ideas or inventions described in your entry, but HopeLab would have the option for one year after the winners are announced to pay your team $250 for the right to use these ideas.

We certainly appreciate that this particular approach will not be suitable for everyone.

Regardless of whether or not someone chooses to participate in Ruckus Nation, we encourage inventors everywhere to consider product ideas that will positively impact the health of young people and wish them great success!

Postby Road Show » Mon Oct 01, 2007 9:00 am

User avatar
Road Show
Brown Belt
 
Posts: 962
Joined: Mon Nov 20, 2006 5:39 pm
Location: SoCal
Hi Richard,

Welcome to ISpot! I, for one, do respect what HopeLab is trying to achieve with the contest. I doubt that your terms will inspire many here to submit their "A" material, but you may still get a kernel of something that can be developed into a quality product. The rules of economics don't disengage because this is a non-profit effort; "there are no free lunches" and "you get what you pay for" are truisms that apply as much to ideas as they do to products. Having said that, I am considering entering this contest. My question to you is this: let's say I, or someone here at ISpot, submit a truly incredible product idea; what are the chances that HopeLab would partner with the inventor to commercialize the product independently of HopeLab's efforts to distribute the product through the non-profit channels? I ask this because it could be the one benefit HopeLab could give an inventor once it has the capability to manufacture the product. Acting in a manufacturing capacity, or by assisting the inventor to develop commercial markets could significantly increase HopeLabs revenue stream from the product. I am eager to hear your response.

Kindly,
RSG

Re: scam

Postby Scrupulous » Mon Oct 01, 2007 2:56 pm

User avatar
Scrupulous
Black Belt
 
Posts: 2387
Joined: Sun Jan 21, 2007 7:32 pm
Location: United States
By submitting an entry, you grant HopeLab an option to acquire a non-exclusive license to any ideas and inventions described in that entry, for which HopeLab will pay $250. This option expires one year from the date on which Ruckus Nation winners are announced. (See Rule 7.2)


Richard Tate of HopeLab wrote:This means that if you do not win in your Competition Category (category winners receive $25,000), you/your team would still own the ideas or inventions described in your entry, but HopeLab would have the option for one year after the winners are announced to pay your team $250 for the right to use these ideas.


Hello Richard:

Your interpretation (above) of the rule is misguided. At best, the original wording of Rule 7.2 can be legally interpreted in two ways. The clearest one of them is that $250 will be exchanged for the option alone, and not the non-exclusive license agreement itself. This means that, even if you could convince a judge of your interpretation, you could not legally hold the entrants from their own favorable intrepretation.

With that in mind, any licensor would need be satisfied that the agreement (payment) is indeed reasonable. The rule is tilted heavily in favor of the entrants, if you intend to enforce it. You would need to provide a seemingly lucrative proposal, to entice the licensor not to just simply wait until the year is up.

Furthermore, because the rule stipulates the option for a non-exclusive agreement, it implies that the licensor is free to acquire other non-exlusive agreements during that period.

The likelihood that you can offer a competitive and reasonable non-exclusive agreement is pretty slim.

Also, your awards for the winning entries, and for the transfer of intellectual property, may be worthwhile, depending on the individuals. However, the wording of your rules on that don't require them to forfeit their IP rights regardless, only if they choose to accept your particular prize amounts. I just thought that was worth mentioning.

With all due respect, I hope you are aware of these things. We would all love to believe this is a noble effort, on your part. And, with your understanding, I'm sure it can be.

Respectfully,

Scrupulous

Postby Richard Tate of HopeLab » Tue Oct 02, 2007 7:44 am

Richard Tate of HopeLab
White Belt
 
Posts: 3
Joined: Mon Oct 01, 2007 7:08 am
Hi, folks -- thanks for the welcome to the community, not to mention the lively discussion!

Again, we (HopeLab) are quite clear that Ruckus Nation is not for everyone. If people feel their ideas can best be realized through other mechanisms and choose not to participate, we respect that. In the end, we would love to see more individuals and commercial enterprises take on the challenge of creating fun, engaging products that improve kids' health, whether it's through Ruckus Nation or not.

A key part of the HopeLab model is to rigorously research the health interventions we develop. To us, this means conducting large-scale, randomized controlled evaluation studies to understand a product's effectiveness in improving key health outcomes. We are also committed to making effective products available broadly to those who would benefit. As a 501(c)3 private operating foundation, the entirety of HopeLab's work is done without cost to our customers (the young people we serve) and without profit to HopeLab. We will apply this same model to developing, researching and distributing the products that come forward through Ruckus Nation.

The people whose ideas are selected as winners may not have a role in the research, development and distribution efforts that will follow Ruckus Nation. The competition is simply a way to engage the community as contestants and judges -- including kids themselves -- to help identify ideas that HopeLab might turn into products that will improve lives. The prototyping, research and final product development will be the work of HopeLab.

The HopeLab process represents a significant investment of time and resources, and as we move forward with ideas from Ruckus Nation, it's important that we be able to conduct research and make resulting products available to kids. To do this, we've developed rules and licensing requirements for Ruckus Nation that we believe will allow us to effectively deliver on our mission.

To address some specific comments/questions I've seen:

- only if a team is named a category winner will it be asked to assign exclusive rights to HopeLab
- it is correct that by submitting an entry, a team grants HopeLab an option to acquire a non-exclusive license to its idea; this means a team that enters still owns its idea, but HopeLab will have the option for one year after the winners are announced to pay $250 for the non-exclusive right to use the idea
- if you're interested in submitting an idea to Ruckus Nation, please read the rules closely and decide whether or not the competition is right for you
- if you support the mission but aren't comfortable submitting an idea, consider being a judge!

Ultimately, Ruckus Nation may not be a competition that appeals to everyone. We're simply inviting folks to support our mission and offering an opportunity to win a chance to help kids, be recognized for a great idea, and to win a prize! Our goal is to create products that work for kids. But if folks decide not to participate, we hope Ruckus Nation inspires people to think critically about how we can get kids more physically active.

I hope this information is helpful. Best of luck to everyone!

Postby Scrupulous » Tue Oct 02, 2007 8:43 am

User avatar
Scrupulous
Black Belt
 
Posts: 2387
Joined: Sun Jan 21, 2007 7:32 pm
Location: United States
Richard,

You're not a very good listener.

YOU wrote:- it is correct that by submitting an entry, a team grants HopeLab an option to acquire a non-exclusive license to its idea; this means a team that enters still owns its idea, but HopeLab will have the option for one year after the winners are announced to pay $250 for the non-exclusive right to use the idea
- if you're interested in submitting an idea to Ruckus Nation, please read the rules closely and decide whether or not the competition is right for you


Ruckus Nation wrote:7.2. By entering Ruckus Nation, you grant HopeLab and its assigns an option to acquire a
perpetual, irrevocable, fully-paid, royalty-free, transferable, non-exclusive, world-wide right and
license to any ideas, works of authorship or inventions described in your Entry. This option will
expire one year from the date when Ruckus Nation Category Winners are announced. If
HopeLab or its assigns chooses to exercise such option, HopeLab or its assigns will pay the
Team Leader $250 USD.


Let me spell it out for you, in exchange for your patronizing insults...

From Ruckus Nation contest rule 7.2, "option to acquire" explicitly states that it it is an option to solicit an agreement from the owner, not an option to exercise one. Naturally, if you choose to seek a "perpetual, irrevocable, fully-paid, royalty-free, transferable, non-exclusive, world-wide right..." then you would probably need to pay dearly for it. You could not force it upon the owner. You will have one year from the date the winners are announced to pay $250 and enter negotiations with an owner.

This isn't up for debate. I'm just repeating what I said earlier. The rule is essentially pointless, because most of the applicants would have been willing to enter negotiations anyway.

Do us a favor, and avoid treating us like children. You've come to the right place for good ideas, as this is the leading inventor website in the world. But, you've come to the wrong place to trick anyone.

You got a whole lotta nerve to say, "if you're interested in submitting an idea to Ruckus Nation, please read the rules closely and decide whether or not the competition is right for you!" If you think I'm kidding, then take your sh!t somewhere else. For now, go do some more homework before you come back.

Go on.

ruckus nation

Postby Roger Brown » Tue Oct 02, 2007 9:32 am

User avatar
Roger Brown
Black Belt
 
Posts: 1178
Joined: Mon Oct 30, 2006 2:53 pm
Location: USA
Not trying to add to the fire. I just want to point out why Inventors are skeptical of contests and Invention Submission companies. One of the basic things that make Inventors gun shy is misinformation. This is wheter it is intended or not.
For Example look at your Ruckus Nation website page http://www.ruckusnation.com/prizes.html

At the top it states
One Grand Prize Winner will receive more than $75,000!


Then just below that in the Grand Prize section it states

One Grand Prize Winner will be selected from the 8 Category Winners. $50,000 for the winning entry
1 prize only


If you just read this it looks like they get $50,000. Are you meaning they get $25,000 for being a catergory winner and then add the $50,000 if they are the Grand Prize winner? Plus since you stated above that they get MORE than $75,000. What is the MORE?

Companies that run contest really need to read and read again their rules and requirements. If they would let somone outside their company read it and give them their perspective of what the rules mean you might be able to catch things before they are on the internet or can be misunderstood.

I would also ask if this is Ruckus Nation's first competition? If it is not, it would be good to show what won last year. You want to build trust with the Inventor community not make them all nervous of your intent.

The option that you have for a nonexclusive for a year after the contest can also throw a wrench into things. If 2 months after the contest is over I find a company that wants an exclusive on my invention I have to either turn them down, notify them that you may come along within a year and be competing with them for a invention they thought they had to themselves. The company I turn down because of your clause may go away and you may never apply your option. So, you are making the individual basically put the idea on hold for a year.
I would think that it shouldn't take a year for a company to decide if they like an idea or not.
Come visit my sites at http://www.RogerBrown.net
or http://www.looking2license.com
I have gotten 9 products licensed spending less than $100 on each, you can too.
PreviousNext

cron