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Invention Con Companies

Postby thinkoutsidethecircle » Tue Oct 10, 2006 11:15 pm

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A reader just sent us an email with info on scams:

Here are 2 links that list many of the invention help companies that have been reported to the federal trade comission, for running scams.
Inventored.org.
USPTO complaints section

I thought they were helpful so I am posting it here.

How to Tell If You Called the Bad Guys

Postby Michelle » Mon Oct 30, 2006 10:11 am

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Terri Phillips wrote a very helpful article:

How to Tell If You Called the Bad Guys
http://www.americaninventorspot.com/the_bad_guys


If anyone has experiences to share, please tell your tale here.
Last edited by Michelle on Mon Oct 30, 2006 10:13 am, edited 1 time in total.

Insider Expose on Invention Submission Firms

Postby Michelle » Mon Oct 30, 2006 10:13 am

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Another Helpful Terri Phillips article is:

Insider Expose on Invention Submission Firms
http://www.americaninventorspot.com/insider_expose

Terri give a great blow by blow on how its all done so read and learn.

Postby Michelle » Sun Nov 19, 2006 12:33 am

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Has anyone has any good or bad experiences with Harshaw Research?

Postby Michelle » Sun Nov 19, 2006 12:59 am

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I am also seeing Aiello Designs come up a lot on our ads. Has anyone had any experience with them?

Postby Ben Tex » Fri Dec 15, 2006 11:28 am

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I need some advice. I'm a client of ISC and through this process have applied for a patent. When my patent application was shown to me, I was surprised at how it was very specific in describing the way the item would be constructed, something I never had indicated or asked for. When I asked the atty about it, he replied that it was just one way it could be done. My understanding was that the patent would cover the "structure and function" of the invention. Since then, I have invested thousands more in the development of a prototype which, while faithful to the original design, is constructed differently. I contacted the attorney again and was told that since the key construction elements were included in the first claim of the patent application, a change such as mine would require a new application. In other words, I've applied for a patent on one way to make the item (which I never specified) and not the item itself. What are my options?

Postby Michelle » Fri Dec 15, 2006 1:14 pm

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Ben,

You may want to post your question in a comment to brent troutt's service listing in our resrouce directory. I know he checks there from time to time.

Michelle

Postby BSME » Sat Dec 16, 2006 3:12 pm

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Ben Tex wrote:I need some advice. I'm a client of ISC and through this process have applied for a patent. When my patent application was shown to me, I was surprised at how it was very specific in describing the way the item would be constructed, something I never had indicated or asked for. When I asked the atty about it, he replied that it was just one way it could be done. My understanding was that the patent would cover the "structure and function" of the invention. Since then, I have invested thousands more in the development of a prototype which, while faithful to the original design, is constructed differently. I contacted the attorney again and was told that since the key construction elements were included in the first claim of the patent application, a change such as mine would require a new application. In other words, I've applied for a patent on one way to make the item (which I never specified) and not the item itself. What are my options?


Why is an attorney specifying the manufacturing technology? This is not a process patent is it? This is quite odd, unless he has engineering support available. I'd say he is out of his league.

Unless you are a manufacturing professional, your production method probably will not be as good as what a skilled practitioner can put together. You're talking about least cost economics, human ergonomics, defect minimization, equipment and tooling reliability, material control, and a host of other issues. Invariably even the best manufacturing plan changes once it goes into practice and people use it. Nobody can think of every single nuance that goes into production. So unless you actually have a production process that you currently use, and it has been completely debugged, you are probably obsolete.

My web-page will show you some of the things I've done with process debugging. We manufactured around 5000 units per day:

http://www.angelfire.com/blog/woodyw/work_examples.html

http://www.angelfire.com/blog/woodyw/bristol.html

Postby Ben Tex » Sat Dec 16, 2006 3:27 pm

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I don't know why. It's a utility patent application.

Postby Myra Per-Lee » Sun Dec 17, 2006 9:26 pm

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Your recourse would depend on your agreement with "ISC?" (Is ISC the name of the company or a generic name for an invention submission company?)

It's probably best if you have, maybe, a contract attorney look over your documents.
Myra Per-Lee
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