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Postby Michelle » Tue Mar 13, 2007 10:20 pm

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Michelle
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Whoo hoo, it's getting hot in here...but this is exactly what we need. True dialogue and discussion.

To jump in in defense of AmericanInventorSpot.com, we put in our Invention Gallery Disclaimer right up front that

"Any disclosure of your invention prior to filing a patent may endanger your ability to protect your invention.AmericanInventorSpot.com urges you to only submit an invention for inclusion in the Gallery after you have consulted with legal counsel and after you have obtained the proper legal protection for your invention."

Also, when we preview a posting for our Invention Gallery, if we think it has not been already disclosed in public, we caution the inventor and suggest they research what the consequences of disclosure is before they post in a public forum...such as ours...then come back to us if they still want to publish their ideas.

Michelle

website

Postby Roger Brown » Wed Mar 14, 2007 4:07 am

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That is my point americaninventorspot may have some of the same verbage as ideawicket, but it is extremely evident that you go the extra mile to make sure the Inventor knows exactly what they are agreeing too. Your intentions are upfront and you go out of your way to help the Inventor.
Yes, every website that offers services has costs they have to deal with and needs revenue. The difference is you don't do it at the expense of the Inventors dreams.
You are constantly asking what you can do to make the site better. You encourage discussions that will enlighten Inventors to opportunities and also warn them of pitfalls that they may not be aware of. That is why I consider this website a true community, not just a sales marketing scheme like other Inventor sites.
Come visit my sites at http://www.RogerBrown.net
or http://www.looking2license.com
I have gotten 9 products licensed spending less than $100 on each, you can too.

Postby scrapbookdi » Wed Mar 14, 2007 5:58 am

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I must say that I am surprised at how much info some people give out about their inventions even with your cautions. I haven't told ANYONE what my invention is, including my own family. Hopefully they heed your suggestions and don't disclose further information that could ruin their invention.

Postby Michelle » Wed Mar 14, 2007 6:10 am

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Thanks Roger for those nice words.

I agree Scrapbook Di. But the biggest mystery to me is how people can go about the invention processs without doing a ton of research first.

Before I did anything, I wold read up on it like a fiend and then figure out what to do, but most people seem to just grab onto the first service or advice....and say too much too fast.

I don't want to be a jerk and say it, but I'll be a jerk and say it, too many people are looking for the easy way.

I think it's like the law of the jungle, the ones who do the hard work are the ones that are successful. The ones that look for the quick answer and the easy fix usually get in trouble. But, what really gets me boiling is the outright fraud. It's so easy to mislead people if you don't have integrity or a sense of right and wrong.

We hope that by making the information more accessible and fun, it will be easier to inform inventors. But like in all things, you can't force anyone to do something that is hard, demanding and time consuming.

Michelle

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Postby Roger Brown » Wed Mar 14, 2007 6:24 am

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As with anything "if you are going to do it, do it right the first time" It is more costly to grab the easiest way of using those invention submission firms just circling like sharks waiting for their next meal. Do your research, know your product idea inside and out, research your competition, prioritize your target markets, then make first contact. You don't go

1. Have an idea
2. Look for someone else to do the work for you
3. Blindly grab the first bite you get
4. Complain when they rip you off

No work, means No reward!

My method seems simple, but it is still a lot of leg work and research. I don't go in blind. I have a strategy before I make the first contact with anyone.
Come visit my sites at http://www.RogerBrown.net
or http://www.looking2license.com
I have gotten 9 products licensed spending less than $100 on each, you can too.

Postby scrapbookdi » Wed Mar 14, 2007 7:19 am

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I think that a lot of people, myself included, are clueless as to how much work the invention process is. I had an idea, searched the stores and their on-line stores that I thought would have it and didn't find it so I thought it didn't exist. After joining this site, I found that I needed to do more research and found something similar to my idea for sale on the internet but not from the sources I thought would have it. Back to the drawing board!

Postby Road Show » Wed Mar 14, 2007 7:33 am

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Another way of saying "do the homework" is "exercising due diligence". If you don't value your invention enough to give it it's due, then you will fail. I did not say MAY fail, I said WILL fail. This is why ideas are viewed as a dime a dozen. I am surprised at how many inventors invent things just because they had an idea. They have no idea whether there is a need for their invention, or even a strong demand, but because their wife, brother, cousin, friend think it's a good idea...well gosh darn it, it's my ticket to the big time. The more I listen to Roger, the sharper I become...not because I view Roger as the "guru", but he has been down the inventing path so many times, he has a very pragmatic approach...AND he looks for the NEED...or asks for the need...AND then he invents. Thanks for sharing your thoughts and ideas with us.

Your disciple :shock: ...er, friend,

RSG :D

inventions

Postby Roger Brown » Wed Mar 14, 2007 7:38 am

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Research is a key componet to finding a niche no one has thought of. Also, when you do find something you want to pitch to a company the company you thought makes the product line you want to hit may not be your best contact.
Here is an example. I have several kitchen utensil items I want to pitch. After doing research i found out the Lifetime Brands actually makes a large number of the items sold by Faberware, Salton, Hoffritz, and Kitchen Aid. So, I am targeting Lifetime not the others. Because if I get it in Lifetime the chances are high I will get it in all those others by only approaching one company.
Had I tried contacting each one of the other companies they would not have told me they don't make their own products. It would have been a waste of time on my part to go after them.
So, again do your research, it saves you time in the long run.
Come visit my sites at http://www.RogerBrown.net
or http://www.looking2license.com
I have gotten 9 products licensed spending less than $100 on each, you can too.
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