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Postby Levi Porter » Wed Oct 29, 2008 10:49 pm

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Patent_Attorney wrote: The few contingency deals were at 50-75% rates and it is akin to the lawyer buying the patent in exchange for forgoing fees and finding a sub-licensee.


That sounds pretty steep, especially if the invention was worth multi millions. At that point, it would seem to be in the inventors best interest to find a small investor to cover attorney fees.

Patent_Attorney wrote:Thus it is a partnership instead of a contingency because there is no 3rd party to pay your client because of a breached duty in the past, only future sales.


That's kinda of an odd way to look at it. In my line of work, I have always preferred to get a piece of the action vs just wages. When I can afford to make less in the beginning, and receive more profit for waiting, I usually do.

With the recent real estate debacle, those days are gone for a while.

Re: The obvious all over again

Postby Levi Porter » Wed Oct 29, 2008 11:18 pm

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Mr Invention wrote:.... Unfortunately I have noticed one thing about this forum in that there is very little discussion about the money that is required to make anything in the real world of business....


I agree that a lot of money is required to turn and idea into reality. I just think at some point the quality of an idea and or in combination with a sound business plan provide attractive ground for investors.

The small time inventor seems to never cover all of the costs involved and sells short or enters a license agreement if successful.

Most don't ever take on manufacturing, distribution, advertising, and the works.

Both Google and Yahoo started out with a piss poor product. It was brilliant in it's day. They improved as technologies developed and was able to attract money that built their empires.

I know your average inventor isn't the next Yahoo or Google, I am just suggesting that even mediocre ideas can have value, and that people should follow their dreams and ideas as long as they keep reality with them.

An exercise in Futility

Postby Mr Invention » Thu Oct 30, 2008 7:45 am

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It is obvious that it would be an exercise in futility for me to expect for you to understand what I post in this forum. It appears as though you are partially if not totally without any capibility of analytical objectivity. I have a MBA and do quite well with numbers thank you. My idea forum was set up with FAQ thus I did not have to personally answer each and every person that came to my web page which averaged over 40,000 hits a year. I must also include talking to people at trade shows where I set up my booths for 20 years, people on the street, people (10,000+ a year) that came to my retail stores that I owned for over 20 years and people that visited my assembly plant in Opa Locka, Fla (Closed after NAFTA came into effect and moved my operation to Mexico and partnershiped in China). Occassionally I will discuss ideas with people in my assembly plans in Meixico and China when I visit there. You are right in that just because a person is 70 years old, that doesn't mean they know a whole hell of a lot and that is usually because they were stupid (Sorry that might be politically incorrect today. I should say less motivated) as children and remained challenged throughout their life up to including their eventual death. I don't really mind explaining this to you because I have been explaining things to 100,000's of people my entire life in the hopes of making the world a better place with the little that I am able to contribute to the same. When it is time for me to die (As we all shall), I want to go with the knowledge that I was a part of the solution and not a part of the problem. As for molds (All Kinds), I have several hundred mold people that have worked for me for over 30 years and they are some of my best friends. Please don't take any of my post personally. I really don't have time to get stressed over a fun idea forum, I have enough stress getting my new products to market everyday and trying to collect for the same. I also think that when participating in this forum one must think in terms that anything is possible but that chance is very small but at the same time if there is a will and money there is a way. In the real world there is always a chance but one must deal with such ventures with a clear head and accept the possibility that there is risk and a chance of failure. Have a nice day.

Re: Can I patent my invention without a patent attorney?

Postby 4PLAY » Fri May 22, 2009 7:32 am

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tony.fulford was right with his initial observation. Asking investors to pay to test your product is very cheeky. However, Microsoft have been doing it for years and if they can get away with it then there is no reason why you shouldn't at least try.

Re: Can I patent my invention without a patent attorney?

Postby Scrupulous » Fri May 22, 2009 8:48 am

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4PLAY wrote:tony.fulford was right with his initial observation. Asking investors to pay to test your product is very cheeky. However, Microsoft have been doing it for years and if they can get away with it then there is no reason why you shouldn't at least try.


Ha!

Thanks 4PLAY. I needed that.

Re: Can I patent my invention without a patent attorney?

Postby bbaker6212 » Fri May 22, 2009 8:06 pm

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Mr Invention, I'll give you the benefit of the doubt that you actually have some positive input to these forums. But can ya tone down the "I'm smarter than you", "I have more experience than you", "I have accomplished sooo much in my biz life" attitude? ... it's really boring and un-impressive and probably creates the opposite effect your are intending with the readers here. I think your attitude detracts from any wisdom you are trying to convey. In a nutshell, IMO you needlessly come off quite argumentative.

Re: Can I patent my invention without a patent attorney?

Postby inventor-x » Fri May 22, 2009 8:12 pm

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Mr Invention is off this website because of his negativity :lol:

by Scrupulous » 22 May 2009 16:48

4PLAY wrote:
tony.fulford was right with his initial observation. Asking investors to pay to test your product is very cheeky. However, Microsoft have been doing it for years and if they can get away with it then there is no reason why you shouldn't at least try.

Ha!

Thanks 4PLAY. I needed that.


This is an Interesting development :wink:

Re: Can I patent my invention without a patent attorney?

Postby terrycan123 » Sat May 23, 2009 12:30 am

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Dear usipe,

Such negativity from all these people.

Your product sounds interesting. Selling it at a lower price to start could be good marketing.

Not everyone can patent their invention on their own.

I recommend reading "Patent It Yourself" by David Pressman.

Some people may do better with your course type of product. Recently I met a man with a cool invention but he was not confident with his writing skills to pursue a patent on is own.

Some success stories with your product would be good marketing.
Massive success to you

Terry Cantwell

http://www.protect-new-idea.com

Re: Can I patent my invention without a patent attorney?

Postby bbaker6212 » Sat May 23, 2009 1:51 pm

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My understanding is a PPA is much more specific than "pretty much describes what your invention is". That it must be fairly thorough in describing exactly how it works and how it can be constructed by someone experienced in the field. Now what is the definition of "thorough" as far as the USPTO is concerned is something I think one understands better the more experience you have in the Patenting field (not unlike other professions). If a PPA not done sufficiently, it's worthless to you later when applying for a real Patent. Worse, publication of it might keep you or anyone else from ever being able to patent the invention later.
I'm no expert, but this is what I understand from what I've read. And even as naive as I am, from what I have learned, I would never try to write my own PPA or non-PPA. Heck, I'm not even confident enough of my thorough patent searching to rely solely on that - so I will follow-up with paying to have a professional do some further searching. Unless you are an expert at using a powerful tool like Delphion, I think you're kidding yourself to think you can do adequate searching in any reasonable amount of time. Just to learn proper searching techniques using such tools could take you longer than it's worth vs paying a professional. IMO, it's like almost everything else.... yes, you can DIY many things, but what is the quality of the outcome and how long will it take to get good results. If the results are not of high quality, then why bother waisting your time? Now, all inventions are not equal, and so quality results may be had if an invention is simple enough, but I would not try it with anything more than simple. I have a B.S. in Computer Science Engineering, but I still would not try it on a complex invention (in my case a software patent).

Like when I remodeled my house... I can do ever bit of it myself (I'm good with tools)...but I learned which things I don't mind doing based on difficulty and my efficiency of doing them vs a professional, and which I would rather pay to have done because the quality and speed a professional provides is worth their asking price.

The more I learn about the Patent process, the more I see what a professional brings to the table.

ManOO

Postby ManOO » Fri May 29, 2009 9:47 am

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