FAQ  •   Login  •   Register  •   Subscribe 

Welcome to the Forum for InventorSpot.com, the most popular invention related website in the world. Read our welcome message.

Skip to content

Moderators: Michelle, Scrupulous, Roger Brown, citizen


Re: Asymmetric Partnerships

Postby jackbnimble56 » Thu Oct 01, 2009 5:22 pm

User avatar
jackbnimble56
Brown Belt
 
Posts: 839
Joined: Thu Mar 26, 2009 11:28 am
Location: Massachusetts
Derek

You give me too much credit but thanks anyway. I should mention that my wife and I have friends that have personal experience dealing with the Chinese. They have two children that they adopted from China and have been there on more than one occasion. I sought some advice on whether I should bring up the issue of counterfeiting as a means of laying all my cards on the table but was advised against it. I was told they would be insulted so I chose discretion as the better part of valor. They confirmed for me what was reported from the Beijing Olympics and that is that the Chinese care a great deal about how they’re perceived in the west.

I located my suppliers through the Global Sources website, which allows one to put out a request for quotes on a material that automatically gets sent to all the suppliers listed on the site. In no time, I had a flood of e-mails (most in broken English) from suppliers eager to do business. I naturally gravitated in the direction of those whose English skills seemed better, who were also able to provide quotes in the form of PDF attachments that looked professionally done. In contrast, some just responded with a few lines in an e-mail throwing out numbers without having asked any detailed questions!

It’s probably a bit easier for someone like you residing down under, as the time difference would not be as pronounced. They are literally on the other side of the planet from me, exactly 12 hours ahead so I often have to cope with that delay but thus far, it has been well worth it. Lastly, I should add that I also try very hard to acknowledge aspects of their culture. For instance, I just recently learned that the entire country is basically on holiday for the first week of October for their fall festival. I find that people of all cultures really appreciate it when you take the time to learn a little about their world. It really seems to help form a strong bond which can only be good for business!

Jack
Nimble Jack Enterprises - Innovative Solutions to Everyday Problems
To purchase the Magic Toob product visit: http://www.magictoob.com/

Re: Asymmetric Partnerships

Postby Derek Pater » Thu Oct 01, 2009 8:04 pm

Derek Pater
Brown Belt
 
Posts: 517
Joined: Fri Jul 25, 2008 3:11 pm
Location: Melbourne Australia
It’s probably a bit easier for someone like you residing down under, as the time difference would not be as pronounced. They are literally on the other side of the planet from me, exactly 12 hours ahead so I often have to cope with that delay but thus far, it has been well worth it. Lastly, I should add that I also try very hard to acknowledge aspects of their culture. For instance, I just recently learned that the entire country is basically on holiday for the first week of October for their fall festival. I find that people of all cultures really appreciate it when you take the time to learn a little about their world. It really seems to help form a strong bond which can only be good for business!


it is easier being in Australia we are 2 hours in front of China and Taiwan, that works out perfect, I can do my own stuff before 12pm and then start will E-mails after my lunch time, gives me the best of both worlds work and play.

When I was in Taiwan July 2009, one of the Manufactures daughters commented on how I made a effort to use chop sticks to eat and to time to see their culture, to be honest it can be a bit overwhelming on how well I was treated, I think to would only let me close the car door half the time.
So My Advice to any Inventors is to show 100% trust and friendship towards the Taiwan, Chinese and Asian people, and you will receive the same in return, if you come across as untrusting or self important, not a good way to go in Asia.

For me to receive the acknowledgment of the Value of my projects like the Roofing Protractor, Stair Square, Tilt Level and Chalkline Protractor from these Manufactures in very good.
Also to see how serious they are about doing business with me know and into the long term future, this is what all Inventors should be chasing is recognition of their work and hey some royalties would be nice to of course.
If you do not focus on making the best product possible with your skills and contacts, then you will set yourself up for failure, like my father said to me “You only get out of life what you put in”
This applies not only Inventions, but everything you do in Life! , Like my Army training, at times I really struggled, because I put in 100% the other Diggers would help me, and this is a two way street, if they struggled I would do my best to help them.

Re: Asymmetric Partnerships

Postby Derek Pater » Fri Oct 02, 2009 1:02 am

Derek Pater
Brown Belt
 
Posts: 517
Joined: Fri Jul 25, 2008 3:11 pm
Location: Melbourne Australia
It’s probably a bit easier for someone like you residing down under, as the time difference would not be as pronounced


Yes there is some truth in that, but guess what If I moved to the U.S I could still run my same Company due to the Internet, yes I will have some odd hour phone calls, but as long as you have a line into the Internet it makes little difference, it is more the mindset of the distance.

The two flights per year to Asia will be 2-3 times long but if thats what you need to do you just do it!

:D :D

Re: Asymmetric Partnerships

Postby Derek Pater » Mon Nov 02, 2009 3:13 am

Derek Pater
Brown Belt
 
Posts: 517
Joined: Fri Jul 25, 2008 3:11 pm
Location: Melbourne Australia
Very good comments below and these threads also have meaning to these comments

viewtopic.php?f=43&t=3502

viewtopic.php?f=29&t=3493

viewtopic.php?f=29&t=3484

by DBayless » 09 Sep 2007 02:29

As I try to learn how to be more effective in the world of innovation, I make periodic posts to my weblog. It helps me think more clearly, and it's kind of therapeutic.

Lately, my colleagues and I have been wrestling with how to overcome the challenges that are inherent with asymmetric partnerships--a licensing agreement between a large company and a small firm or individual inventor, for example. I thought some of you in this forum might find <a href="http://swni.typepad.com/dispatches/2007/09/asymmetric-part.html">my summary of some relevant research</a> helpful. The basic ideas is that the chances of successful collaborations will increase if both parties have a better understanding of each other's objectives and limitations.

Here's the short version:

Large firms want access to prospective innovations in order to help them achieve their growth objectives. Small firms want access to large firms' manufacturing, marketing, and distribution capacities in order to maximize their chances for (and speed of) success.

However, the strategic objective of partnerships is viewed very differently by large firms and small firms. Small firms are seeking commitment. Large firms, on the other hand, seek flexibility--they are motivated to make commitment contingent.

Furthermore, the pace of decision-making is very, very different. Small firms and individuals can make decisions almost instantaneously. Decision-making at large firms is slow, complex, and <a href="http://swni.typepad.com/dispatches/2007/06/hunting-moby-di.html">unpredictable</a>.

The net result is a lack of trust (which is exacerbated by both parties' fear of losing control over their respective insights, learning, and intellectual property). Unfortunately, <a href="http://swni.typepad.com/dispatches/2007/09/the-trust-parad.html">building trust is the hardest when it is needed the most</a>.

Many inventors and entrepreneurs decide to wash their hands of large companies and conclude that it is better to go it alone. Sometimes, that is probably the right call. (My colleagues and I come to that conclusion, too, in some situations.) Even so, it strikes me that, while hard, collaboration between small and large firms is sometimes so compelling that it makes sense to figure out how to cultivate trust.

How have you been able to develop sufficient trust to enable a successful license deal with a large company?
Previous

cron