FAQ  •   Login  •   Register  •   Subscribe 

Welcome to the Forum for InventorSpot.com, the most popular invention related website in the world. Read our welcome message.

Skip to content

Moderators: Michelle, Scrupulous, citizen


New motor design

Postby allmee » Tue Jul 10, 2007 11:27 pm

allmee
White Belt
 
Posts: 9
Joined: Tue Jul 10, 2007 11:09 pm
I have designed a new motor that is more efficient than the standed piston motor and i am looking for investors. i have also invented a new crank shaft system that i am not going to patent but let go for free.
it is posted on,
http://forum.physorg.com/index.php?showtopic=16015
http://www.scienceforums.net/forum/show ... hp?t=27332
http://www.sciforums.com/showthread.php?t=68775
and a few others

Postby toyotaboy02 » Wed Jul 11, 2007 8:03 pm

User avatar
toyotaboy02
White Belt
 
Posts: 37
Joined: Thu Jun 14, 2007 5:17 pm
as discussed in the last link, I see problems with this design from a wear standpoint. Understand that pistons even at idle rotate at 1k rpm (that's 16 rotations every second). I can easily see the gears jamming, the springs wearing prematurly trying to slow it down.. and most of all, I don't understand how this makes for a better engine, care to elaborate?

Postby AmericanCynic » Wed Jul 11, 2007 8:13 pm

AmericanCynic
Yellow Belt
 
Posts: 99
Joined: Sun Jun 10, 2007 11:07 pm
It's already been done, and done better. I forget the inventor, but there was something called the Bar-Cam patented a few years ago. It was superior to this design in many regards, for instance conserving angular momentum at the ends of the stroke.

Postby allmee » Thu Jul 12, 2007 10:11 pm

allmee
White Belt
 
Posts: 9
Joined: Tue Jul 10, 2007 11:09 pm
In a standed four cylinder engine there is always one combustion cycle happening at each change of direction for the gears even if there is a misfire there is still the compression from the pistion.
There are springs in a over head cam system.
the system will have to be made out of high tension light weight metal.
In a standed crank shaft system there is lost energy from tdc which is were combustion happens (the standed crank having a circular motion which at tdc has to move to the side, At halve of tdc and bdc is the best energy transference point) to the drive system, which at tdc is mostly pushing the crank shaft down, not turning it.

Postby AmericanCynic » Thu Jul 12, 2007 10:22 pm

AmericanCynic
Yellow Belt
 
Posts: 99
Joined: Sun Jun 10, 2007 11:07 pm
It'd be a bit easier to understand if you stop writing "standed." It's "standard." And here is the superior Bar-Cam design. As you can see, it also spends the vast majority of its time at maximum torque. The big difference is that the gear is always engaged, unlike your design, where it's hit or miss whether the teeth will mesh or just break off instead. Not to mention there's always the chance that your gear will stop with the teeth either up or down, meaning the piston will never re-engage them no matter how long you run your motor. You simply have no way to keep the gear teeth and piston synchronized.

Postby bottleslingguy » Fri Jul 13, 2007 3:52 am

User avatar
bottleslingguy
Black Belt
 
Posts: 1753
Joined: Sun Oct 22, 2006 7:41 am
I was going to mention it looked like he might have timing problems. What's the piston doing while it is waiting for the crankshaft gear to reengage, just sitting at bdc waiting for the crankshaft gear to "re-engage"? That's going to be a tough nut to crack and waste a lot of time, energy and efficiency, not to mention wear and tear, e.g. the first gear tooth hitting (re-engaging) the connecting rod gear. Isn't it?

Coincedentally I proposed a device at Halfbakery where you would suspend really large kites with balloons up into the jetstream to utilize the tugging motion in order to turn an electric generator. This sort of transferance/linkage from lateral motion to rotary motion would be just the thing needed. Needless to say nobody liked it.

AC, on a side note. It sounds petty to pick on peoples' spelling mistakes, almost as if you've run out of an argument and now need to pick on a particular flaw. Although it WAS funny, couldn't we all have just snickered in silent respect for the handicap of misspelled words? I know I have a problem with "its" and "it's". :lol: 8)

Postby AmericanCynic » Fri Jul 13, 2007 9:14 am

AmericanCynic
Yellow Belt
 
Posts: 99
Joined: Sun Jun 10, 2007 11:07 pm
If it's a one-time mistake, I overlook it. But if somebody's going to make the same mistake over and over again, it doesn't help him for the rest of us to just sit back and laugh. You should tell him how to fix it. We're here to teach and learn from each other. Show me where in my post I use a mocking tone. If he wants to be taken seriously, he needs to know how to present himself properly. When somebody's posts are hard to read and understand, some people may just decide to stop reading. If that makes me a grammar or spelling nazi, then so be it. It's no worse than what he would have been told in an English class.

Postby bottleslingguy » Fri Jul 13, 2007 7:13 pm

User avatar
bottleslingguy
Black Belt
 
Posts: 1753
Joined: Sun Oct 22, 2006 7:41 am
Relax.

Postby allmee » Sat Jul 14, 2007 9:38 pm

allmee
White Belt
 
Posts: 9
Joined: Tue Jul 10, 2007 11:09 pm
The system will not work on single piston motors, with four pistons two pistons are connected at all times the gears between the pistons are connected to all pistons, so tdc or bdc will not matter.

Postby bottleslingguy » Sun Jul 15, 2007 4:28 am

User avatar
bottleslingguy
Black Belt
 
Posts: 1753
Joined: Sun Oct 22, 2006 7:41 am
So then, the (at least) one piston is sitting at bdc waiting for the other piston or two to torque the crankshaft around until the gears re-engage with those connecting rod gears pushing the piston back up to compress the fuel/air mixture. I assume your "crankshaft" is a straight shaft and not a "crank" shaft. A normal crankshaft's offset design utilizes the leverage of those offset "levers" to torque the shaft. We all know levers are an essential component in increasing your workload capability (remember that dude with the "big enough" lever moving the whole Earth?)

Well, all that torque requirement is now handed over to that first one or two little gears at that side of the crankshaft. And it's only on one side of the conecting rod too, mind you. When they re-engage, there is now a huge load on a much much smaller surface area (in comparison to a system that never has to re-engage) in which to make an impact and cause noise, friction, heat, and damage. Even some sort of ratcheting system is going to have more friction, heat and noise. No?
Next

cron